All posts by Jon

Forrester’s social technographics profile tool

If you’re here because you’ve read my article in the newsletter of the School of Business and Nonprofit Management from North Park University, welcome. I’m pleased to pass along a simple “starter” tool that helps demonstrate the importance of various social-media activities for particular portions of the population.

Play a little with this tool, noting particularly anywhere your clients or constituents would have an index (in the right column of the chart) over 100. That’s a mode in which they’re especially primed to engage you in conversation via social media.

When you’re ready to take this initial information further, I highly recommend the following books for lots more, detailed strategy advice and information:

I look forward to your joining the conversation!

Core tasks

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.

— Robert Heinlein, The Notebooks of Lazarus Long

How many of these can you do? Here’s how I would tabulate my results:

Proficiently    10
Acceptably 6
Badly 2
Not at all 2
Unknown 1

Thanks to Jeff Scripter for the quotation.

Flatstock Noob

I’m feeling like a bit of a dork. At Flatstock 26 here in Chicago a couple weeks back, while I was buying a poster, its designer asked about a button I was wearing, having picked it up a few minutes earlier at another booth.

“Crosshair?” he asked — seeming not to recognize the name. “I’ve seen that name around, but who is that?” I didn’t really hear him, and when he went on, “I mean, is it a designer or a group?” I just didn’t follow the question.

Now I can’t help thinking I must have been being played as a pawn in some kind of poster-designers’ nerd-war, in which one printer tries to prove that noobs don’t recognize the other.

For how could any Flatstock artist not know Dan MacAdam? His gorgeous Chicago factory water tank poster hangs right here on my wall, and you could never forget it.

The Loss of Brown’s Woods: A Letter to Scott Russell Sanders

Review of A Conservationist Manifesto, by Scott Russell Sanders (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2009).

A version of this review first appeared in print in The Common Review 8, no. 3 (Winter 2010): 42-44. (TCR unfortunately does not make its content available online).

See below for a letter to the editor taking issue with this review, and my response. Continue reading The Loss of Brown’s Woods: A Letter to Scott Russell Sanders